Hello and welcome to our community! Is this your first visit?
Register
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
Results 1 to 2 of 2
  1. #1
    Regular Coder
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    705
    Thanks
    8
    Thanked 17 Times in 16 Posts

    Pagination Script

    I am currently in need of a simple pagination that will run from a database, basicly it will go to a table called 'persons' and post every row on seperate pages, limiting it to 10 or 15 each page.

    If someone can help me out with that I would be happy.

    What it needs to do:
    Get rows from 'persons' table
    show rows on a webpage.
    limit up to 10 rows on each page, then creates a next page or a page number.

    Thank You.

  • #2
    Regular Coder
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    705
    Thanks
    8
    Thanked 17 Times in 16 Posts
    Hm I have gotten it to work:

    PHP Code:
    <?php

    /*
    Check whether the 'page' GET variable is not defined or equals zero.
    In either case, an error is sent and the script terminated.
    */

    if(empty($_GET['page'])) {
    echo 
    'Page number is not defined!';
    exit();
    }

    /*
    The following makes sure that the 'page' variable only contains numbers,
    therefore limiting it to just integers(whole numbers).
    */

    else if(!preg_match("/^([0-9])+$/",$_GET['page'])) {
    echo 
    'Page is not a valid value!';
    exit();
    }

    /*
    If the 'num' GET variable isn't defined in the URI, then the var num_per_page is by default set to 10.
    This utilizes the ternary operator. After the check for existence, then there is a check to make sure that
    the string contains only an integer using the same method as above.
    */

    $num_per_page = (empty($_GET['num']))? 10 $_GET['num'];
    if(!
    preg_match("/^([0-9])+$/",$num_per_page)) {
    echo 
    'Num is not a valid value!';
    exit();
    }
    //Get the page number from the URI; the pages start when page=1, not page=0
    $page $_GET['page'];

    /*
    Connect to database and then select a database.
    You can also include this information if you want, but this is just an example ;)
    */

    $link mysql_connect('localhost','****','****');
    mysql_select_db('*******');

    /*
    This piece is the essence of pagination. Using LIMIT in the mysql query is what we are going
    to use for this. The following line creates a new variable, qPage, which is the value of the
    page number minus one times the number of rows you want to show up on each page.
    For example, if page = 1 in the URI, then 1-1*10 = 0. This is the offset for the LIMIT in the query.
    If page = 2then 2-1*10 = 10. Since 10 is the number per page in the example, then it only makes sense
    to start the next limit at an offset of 10.
    */

    $qPage = (($page-1)*$num_per_page);

    /*
    The following is the query of the pagination; this is where the magic takes place.
    the SELECT is self-explanatory. The LIMIT is the most important. LIMIT has the syntax
    LIMIT [offset],[length]. Knowing this format you should be able to follow the query now.
    Now for the following you are probably wondering why I added 1 to the value for the number per page.
    I did this simply to know if there is going to be another page after the current one. We will need this
    information later when we are echoing out the 'Next page' link.

    Note: You may want to change the query to fit your needs, however the LIMIT clause should stay the same.
    Everything else can be changed :)
    */

    $query "SELECT * FROM `persons` ORDER BY `id` ASC LIMIT ".$qPage.",".($num_per_page+1);
    //You should remove the 'die(mysql_error());' part of the following after development
    $result mysql_query($query) or die(mysql_error());

    /*
    Here 'num' is set to the number of rows that the above query returned. The condition simply
    sees if the number of rows returned equals zero, because if it does than that means that there
    are no more rows for the specified LIMIT.
    */

    $num mysql_num_rows($result);
    if(
    $num == 0) {
    echo 
    'No more results!';
    exit();
    }

    /*
    Here's is another interesting part. At first thought one may want to use a while loop here.
    The only problem with the while loop is that it echos that last row that we selected in the
    query when we don't want it to. Instead of handling this it's easier to use a for loop
    instead, using the num_per_page variable as shown. Obviously you can format the HTML and PHP
    output however you'd like; I'm just outputting the array as an example.
    */

    for($i 0$i $num_per_page$i++) {
    $row mysql_fetch_array($result);
    echo 
    '<pre>';
    print_r($row);
    echo 
    '</pre>';
    }
    mysql_close($link); //Close the link to the MySQL database.

    /*
    This goes back to selecting that extra row in the query. If the amount selected (num) is
    greater than the number per page(num_per_page) than that means that there is at least one more
    row to be returned after the the range that you want, therefore you know you can echo the 'Next Page'
    link without having to worry if you are linking to a blank page or not.

    The rest should be self-explanatory. If you are going onto the next page, you are going to increment the
    page variable by one, and of course you still want to keep the current number per page otherwise you may
    see repeats, so you just echo that value in it's corresponding place within the url query.
    */

    if($num $num_per_page) {
    echo 
    '<a href="index.php?page='.($page+1).'&num='.$num_per_page.'">Next Page</a>';
    }
    echo 
    '<br/>'//Just acts as a separator for the two links ;)

    /*
    The following acts the same way as above, however instead of incrementing you are subtracting one from the
    page variable to 'go back' to the previous page. Obviously you do not want to 'go back' when you are on the first page
    to begin with, so we first check to make sure that the page value is larger than '1' (our first page) before we start
    echoing it to the browser.
    */

    if($page 1) {
    echo 
    '<a href="index.php?page='.($page-1).'&num='.$num_per_page.'">Previous Page</a>';
    }

    ?>
    But it is spitting out the information like this:

    Code:
    Array
    (
        [0] => 
        [FirstName] => 
        [1] => 
        [LastName] => 
        [2] => 173.70.169.187
        [Ip] => 173.70.169.187
        [3] => August 25 2009
        [AddedDate] => August 25 2009
        [4] => 98
        [id] => 98
    )
    
    Array
    (
        [0] => 
        [FirstName] => 
        [1] => 
        [LastName] => 
        [2] => 173.70.169.187
        [Ip] => 173.70.169.187
        [3] => August 25 2009
        [AddedDate] => August 25 2009
        [4] => 99
        [id] => 99
    )
    
    Array
    (
        [0] => 
        [FirstName] => 
        [1] => 
        [LastName] => 
        [2] => 173.70.169.187
        [Ip] => 173.70.169.187
        [3] => August 25 2009
        [AddedDate] => August 25 2009
        [4] => 100
        [id] => 100
    )
    
    Array
    (
        [0] => 
        [FirstName] => 
        [1] => 
        [LastName] => 
        [2] => 173.70.169.187
        [Ip] => 173.70.169.187
        [3] => August 25 2009
        [AddedDate] => August 25 2009
        [4] => 101
        [id] => 101
    )
    How do I make it more formatted like in a table or a nicer way.


  •  

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •