Hello and welcome to our community! Is this your first visit?
Register
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    New to the CF scene
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    1
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    need some advice

    okay, so im planning on starting an online retail business and im fairly new to coding. i want to be able to sort the items for sale and then display them in order. i just need some help on where to start. i was thinking of using a server side script or xml or something to give the items values like rating=some number and then sort them from highest to lowest, then have the web page display the items in order. am i going about this in the right way? any suggestion would help

  • #2
    Supreme Master coder! Old Pedant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    27,688
    Thanks
    80
    Thanked 4,655 Times in 4,617 Posts
    Unless you have a real penchant for self-abuse, the best advice we can give is that you go find an off-the-shelf ecommerce solution, instead of trying to write your own from the ground up.

    But if you are determined...

    Yes, server-side, for sure. But *ALL* the code server side. (Well, excepting for the "pretty" stuff.) No reason to sort items in JS coding when you can more easily sort them in the PHP/ASP/JSP/ASP.NET/CF coding.

    Let me say that I have written dozens of web sites over the years and worked on some fairly sophisticated ones. And *I* would not create my own ecommerce site. There are *SO* many of them out there, and they are *SO* inexpensive (many even free), that it's simply not worth my time and certainly not worth the headaches of trying to anticipate every possible customer problem ahead of time.

    Tweak some off-the-shelf code? Sure! Enhance it? Darned tootin'. But write it from scratch? Therein lies madness.
    An optimist sees the glass as half full.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty.
    A realist drinks it no matter how much there is.

  • #3
    Supreme Master coder! Philip M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    London, England
    Posts
    18,316
    Thanks
    203
    Thanked 2,566 Times in 2,544 Posts
    Presumably you would not attempt to service or repair a machine or appliance without any experience or understanding of how it worked.

    If you are running a business, you should focus on that business, and not waste your valuable time faffing around with something you do not really understand. It is as silly as attempting to generate your own electricity.

    The biggest cost of all to your business is ... sales not made (and of course there is no ledger account for this). Every visitor to your site who has a poor experience of some kind is lost to you, not just for this sale, but for ever.

  • Users who have thanked Philip M for this post:

    Old Pedant (11-10-2010)

  • #4
    Supreme Master coder! Old Pedant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    27,688
    Thanks
    80
    Thanked 4,655 Times in 4,617 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Philip M View Post
    The biggest cost of all to your business is ... sales not made (and of course there is no ledger account for this). Every visitor to your site who has a poor experience of some kind is lost to you, not just for this sale, but for ever.
    That is wonderfully well expressed, Philip! I don't think I've seen that said more simply nor more powerfully.
    An optimist sees the glass as half full.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty.
    A realist drinks it no matter how much there is.

  • #5
    Supreme Master coder! Philip M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    London, England
    Posts
    18,316
    Thanks
    203
    Thanked 2,566 Times in 2,544 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Old Pedant View Post
    That is wonderfully well expressed, Philip! I don't think I've seen that said more simply nor more powerfully.
    Thank you, kind sir!

    Over the years I have seen too many bean-counters in industry and government implement cost savings which caused a huge loss of revenue, often by diluting the product quality or reducing the service in some way. The net benefit of these cost savings was often negative.

    Right now the UK Government is announcing cost savings of millions of pounds which will result in (hidden) cost increases elsewhere of tens of millions of pounds. For example, releasing adolescents from prison several months early. But in 95% of cases that just allows them to commit futher crimes that much sooner. So the costs to the victims, the police, the courts etc, rise even more.

    Another good example - in the UK many Post Offices have been closed down, causing many people to make long (or longer) journies to get to their nearest one. That reduced the cost of running the Post Offices - but increased the cost to the user of using them very greatly. My proposal to charge each customer a flat £1 service fee for each separate visit to a Post Office (regardless of the value of the transcaction) would have raised much revenue. And avoided large costs in the form of bus fares and extra time (no ledger account for this!) incurred by users, (especially the elderly amd those in rural areas).
    Of course, my proposal was not taken up.

    Too often cost reduction just means throwing that cost (and more) onto someone else, so the total system cost increases.

  • #6
    Supreme Master coder! Old Pedant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    27,688
    Thanks
    80
    Thanked 4,655 Times in 4,617 Posts
    You certainly won't get any disagreement from me on all that!

    People always want more service from the government for less taxes. Funny, how that's impossible to accomplish. But go blame the politicians! They're an easy target.
    An optimist sees the glass as half full.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty.
    A realist drinks it no matter how much there is.

  • #7
    New Coder
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    New Jersey USA
    Posts
    81
    Thanks
    13
    Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Old Pedant View Post
    Unless you have a real penchant for self-abuse, the best advice we can give is that you go find an off-the-shelf ecommerce solution, instead of trying to write your own from the ground up.

    But if you are determined...

    Yes, server-side, for sure. But *ALL* the code server side. (Well, excepting for the "pretty" stuff.) No reason to sort items in JS coding when you can more easily sort them in the PHP/ASP/JSP/ASP.NET/CF coding.

    Let me say that I have written dozens of web sites over the years and worked on some fairly sophisticated ones. And *I* would not create my own ecommerce site. There are *SO* many of them out there, and they are *SO* inexpensive (many even free), that it's simply not worth my time and certainly not worth the headaches of trying to anticipate every possible customer problem ahead of time.

    Tweak some off-the-shelf code? Sure! Enhance it? Darned tootin'. But write it from scratch? Therein lies madness.
    Great advice...

    There are many ecommerce sites online which do the work for you. The only one I can remember from school back a couple years ago is X-cart. I am pretty sure they charge you but you can search on Google for free ones. I would spend more time planning on how you are going to get traffic to your site rather than spending most your time coding... Start looking into Google adwords, Google analytics and other useful ecommerce tools.

  • #8
    Regular Coder tpeck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    884
    Thanks
    53
    Thanked 6 Times in 5 Posts
    I agree with everything said above (and had a good laugh and many nods in agreement!).

    There are any number of shopping carts online. Some way too expensive, some not and some free.

    Sometimes it depends on where you operate.

    I started off with Mal's eCommerce. You can just do it with Buy buttons. But eventually, you might need something more robust.

    I use zencart - you can get help in their forums. Tip: buy a template if you want it to look good.

    Or check others out here: http://www.shopping-cart-reviews.com/

    But, no don't code it whatever you do! I think the pages have to be in PHP anyway to be secure.
    The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits. (Albert Einstein)

  • #9
    Supreme Master coder! Old Pedant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    27,688
    Thanks
    80
    Thanked 4,655 Times in 4,617 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by tpeck View Post
    I think the pages have to be in PHP anyway to be secure.
    Or ASP or ASP.NET or CF or JSP... But yes, they MUST be server-side code.

    Shopping carts that *appear* to be all HTML/JavaScript inevitably are actually serviced by some server-side code on a third party site, which means you can pay up front or pay later.
    An optimist sees the glass as half full.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty.
    A realist drinks it no matter how much there is.


  •  

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •