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  1. #1
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    Page looks different at different resolutions

    I am trying to build my site to look good at both 800 and 1024 resolutions. I have a html page attached to a template and that template is built using a 100% width table. On this html page I am making another table to I can insert an image in one cell and text in the next cell horizontal to it. (I have three columns altogether and they are built using percentages not pixels - the table itself is 80%).

    I indented the text in the second cell. This all works well in 800 res but when I change to 1024 res the text is placed too far away from the image unless I undo the Indent. I am teaching myself this stuff as I go and TAbles are sure proving interesting!

    Do I accept that this is a normal difference when a page is viewed at different resolutions,or is there a trick to solve it?

    Thanks for any advice.

    Julie

  • #2
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    /*snip
    Last edited by harbingerOTV; 01-30-2005 at 08:39 AM.

  • #3
    Regular Coder Graft-Creative's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JulieAsking
    Do I accept that this is a normal difference when a page is viewed at different resolutions,or is there a trick to solve it?
    In a word: Yes. A page designed to expand and contract to fit the users resolution is bound to look different depending on resolution. The trick is, to decide which parts of your page you want to expand, and which parts you dont want to.

    Use fixed widths for the sections you want to stay fixed (personally I think it's a good idea to apply fixed or maximum widths to any blocks of text, to ensure good readability - even at high resolutions). The use percentages, as you have, for the parts you wish to be able to expand.


    [QUOTE=JulieAsking]
    ..........and TAbles are sure proving interesting!
    [/qoute]

    That's because tables were never intended as a device for laying out pages - they were intended to display tabular data, such as timetables or comparison charts. If you rely on tables for your layout, you'll soon find yourself nesting table within table within table - just to get the simplest of layouts to look right.

    Why not look into using css for your layout - or at least use a transitional approach where you have a table for your main layout - then use css to style everything within your main table layout.

    Kind Regards,

    Gary

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    Gary
    Thank you for your reply. The thing that worries me about CSS (apart from a whole new learning curve that will take time) is that from what I read, not all browsers will display CSS the way you intended.

    As I will eventually be moving on to doing a website for my boss I am concerned about this. A lot of his patients are older people and may not use the latest browsers to begin with. Am I right in "playing it safe" with just using HTML do you think?

    Cheers
    Julie

  • #5
    Regular Coder Graft-Creative's Avatar
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    Trust me, tables are no way to guarantee that a site looks the same in every browser - this is why so many of us jumped on css for layouts - I've spent many hours in the past banging my head against the monitor in despair, wondering how the hell I could get my table based layout to look exactly the same in IE & netscape; often ending up making two different versions of the same site - but that was nearly six years ago, things have moved on a little now I still bang my head against the monitor now & then, but at least it feels like I'm working with the technology - rather than against it.

    With the css/semantic html approach - you are concentrating on your content; the important stuff - take away your stylesheet - your document still makes sense, even to your elderly customers using old browsers and slow connections. Web Standards & accessibility aren't muttered in the same sentence so often for no reason.

    The learning curve is really no greater than the one required for learning to use tables for layouts - plus there's the incentive of, well, just learning things the way they are meant to be, instead of learning to bludgeon outdated hacks into some semblance of a decent layout.

    Anyway, back to your question, lke I said, have a go at a transitional approach & in the meantime this could be worth a read http://www.hotdesign.com/seybold/

    Kind Regards,

    Gary

  • #6
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    Take Gary's advice on this one, he's leading you down the right path
    Bite the bullet now and get into CSS, as opposed to becoming too comfortable doing it the wrong way. (if anyone still wants to have the 'table layout isn't evil' debate; bring it )

    The sooner you switch, the easier it will be.
    ..and it's not like CSS is a fad that's going to fade away. Tablular layouts are the fading fad in this scenario..it was just a very long fad

    I take no responsibility for the above nonsense.


    Left Justified

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    Gary and Andrew

    Thanks for your thoughts. I read that site you sent Gary and I also had a play at the hotdog site with CSS and I admit it's impressive. I guess at the very least now I will have a style sheet happening. Looks like the library's gonna be fresh out of CSS books tonight.

    Gary - one thing - when you said <take away your stylesheet - your document still makes sense, even to your elderly customers using old browsers and slow connections>, I'm taking that to mean that if the browsers the oldies are using wont read CSS, everything on the pages will just appear in correct placement but in default mode. You are telling me this is safe right?

    Cheers
    Julie

  • #8
    Regular Coder Graft-Creative's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JulieAsking
    ..........wont read CSS, everything on the pages will just appear in correct placement but in default mode. You are telling me this is safe right?
    Kind of Julie - there are a couple of different ways of hiding stylesheets from older/uncommon browsers - the result being that those older browsers are presented with a page somewhat akin to a plain word processor document.

    If your html is properly marked up, using headers, paragraphs, lists etc, then the resulting page will be fully usable to anyone, using any possible device to access your site.

    What you can also do is feed older browsers a basic set of styles, while hiding the more complex stuff from them - but at the same time letting modern browsers use all the style information they can handle.

    A couple of things to bear in mind that might help your understanding of css:

    CSS isn't a new fad, as Andrew said, it's as old as the first graphical browsers, and maybe older than that. Each browser, be it IE, Netscape, Opera, has a default set of css rules built into it; default rules on how to display every html tag there is. So using CSS for your design means you are adjusting, or overiding the browsers default stylesheet.

    See, CSS isn't the latest, greatest elitist fad - far from it.

    Secondly, if you think of each element or tag as living in it's own little box to which you can apply positioning, borders, backgrounds, margins, padding etc then css will make a lot more sense. It really is such a powerful layout tool - while html is no layout tool at all, nor was it ever intended to be.

    Hope that helps a bit,

    Gary

  • #9
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    Gary, Thank you for the time you have taken in your replies. I am getting quite excited about this CSS method and am working through some tutorials to gain an understanding of it. It is good to have this forum holding my hand.

    Cheers
    Julie


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