Hello and welcome to our community! Is this your first visit?
Register
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    New Coder
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    37
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Question Jagged edges on graphic!

    Firstly, I confess that I'm more of a conventional paint & canvas artist!
    A friend of mine wants to use one of my hand-drawn ink designs as her cd cover.
    So I scanned the black and white drawing and proceeded to tidy it up. I used the magic wand tool first but that didn't work well so I did it the only other way I know - pixel by painful pixel!
    That was a waste of time too - all the edges are ragged! (see atached)

    I will be adding colour and an embossed effect when I get a good enough black & white image.

    How do I get my original scanned sketch to look good enough to get to that stage?
    Thanks )

    note: I'm a novice Corel PhotoPaint user so be gentle!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Jagged edges on graphic!-draglogo_samp.jpg  
    Last edited by mightyatom; 11-28-2006 at 12:29 AM.

  • #2
    Senior Coder
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    1,304
    Thanks
    11
    Thanked 283 Times in 282 Posts
    A couple things come to mind...

    I notice your labels say "100%@300dpi" and "200%@300dpi". What are you thinking the "300dpi" means? My monitor happens to be 72dpi, so that's what I'm viewing these at. I seriously doubt if you have a 300dpi monitor, so have you printed this at 300dpi (the image would be about an inch square, right?), to see what it looks like? I don't have the tools to do that right now, but my guess is it'll look great.

    Second, and related. You're doing this as a pure black or white image, no grays. So it only makes sense that when you look at the edge of the design, and zoom in close, you'll see a stairstepped edge. No way around it. So if your other processing will be smoothing the edge via shading, it will certainly have a softer edge, if that's what you're looking for.

    Hope that helps,

    Dave

  • #3
    Senior Coder
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Memphis, TN
    Posts
    1,785
    Thanks
    8
    Thanked 131 Times in 129 Posts
    I dont know anything about photopaint so take this all with a grain.

    since your going to color it is it going to be on a colored background? if it is it will loose a lot of the jaggedness right away as long as the background is not a solid color. kinda fool the eye you know.

    Plus this is going to be a cd right? something like 5"x5". is your original bigger? if it is, scan the whole thing in and modify it at full scale. once you reduce the size, that will also clean it up some.

    if corel has layers, you can also copy the image to anew one. move it behind the top layer and add a sligtht blur to it which will clean it up some as well.
    Stop making things so hard on yourself.
    i is tugbucket :: help raise tugburg :: Whitehaven Kiwanis

  • #4
    New Coder
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    37
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Thanks you two!
    I really dunno bout dpi.
    The image will be cd size - 120x120mm, that's all I know.
    Because it will be for print and not for the web (which is usually 72dpi as far as I know), I dunno what dpi to work with!
    I'm now working with the image approx 10% bigger than the original.

    All I know is that the jaggy edges still show up when I emboss etc. and make the image look scrappy.

  • #5
    Senior Coder
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    1,304
    Thanks
    11
    Thanked 283 Times in 282 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by mightyatom View Post
    Thanks you two!
    I really dunno bout dpi.
    The image will be cd size - 120x120mm, that's all I know.
    Here's the math:
    120mm = 12cm. 12cm = 4.72in. If you print at 300dpi (the low end of the scale, but quite common) 4.72in * 300 dpi = 1417 pixels across. So the image you're working with needs to be 1417 pixels square, if you're going to print it on a 300dpi printer and have it end up 120mm square.

    I hope that makes sense.

    Because it will be for print and not for the web (which is usually 72dpi as far as I know), I dunno what dpi to work with!
    Don't use the "dpi" setting in Photoshop at all, then. It's essentially irrelevant. You need an image that's 1417 pixels across, assuming 300dpi when you print. If you're printing at 600 dpi, you'll want an image that's 2834 pixels. Keep in mind you can always sample downwards from a larger image, but it's going to be very hard to sample up. So if you made your art 10000 pixels square, then you could easily scale it down, but if it's the size of the image you posted above (about 300 pixels square) it's going to look bad when scaled up to the needed 1417.

    I'm now working with the image approx 10% bigger than the original.
    I'm not sure what you mean by this. 10% bigger in the sense that when you hold your art up to your 72dpi screen, the screen image is 10% bigger? That may work for a screen image, but your intended target is a printer, not the screen. Print your image out at 300 dpi, then see how it compares to the 120mm you actually need.

    All I know is that the jaggy edges still show up when I emboss etc. and make the image look scrappy.
    Hopefully the above will help. This should not happen if your image is the correct size.

    Dave

  • #6
    New Coder
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    37
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    That info is excellent tracknut! I have taken note, especially the dpi info which is very handy.
    I'd like to thank all of you for your valuable help. I now have it sussed - well, the pics are much better than before.

    Thanks and have a wonderful Christmas!


  •  

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •