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  1. #1
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    Question 1, 2 or more HDs, Whats better??

    Hi guys, I was wondering what is better in terms of security, viruses, RAM usage, etc, about having 1 or 2 huge Hard Drives or to have many big ones.

    It's just that I've seen that there are 1 TB HDs and I also know of people who have more than 3-4 HDs with 200 GB or more.

    So if anyone knows about this, I would like to know.....also notice that I'm considering this about a Windows XP computer (not a Linux one )

  • #2
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    It really depends on what are you going to be doing. If you are going to have lots of valuable data, many smaller drives configured in like a RAID 5 configuration would be better. If you are just going to be using it for normal computer use, a single larger drive would fine. The situation is really a crucial factor is determing the best data storage setup.
    OracleGuy

  • #3
    Supreme Master coder! _Aerospace_Eng_'s Avatar
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    well in my laptop i have a 40gb hard drive used for just every day use but i reformat often just to do it, so rather than back up my data everytime i reformat, i decided to partition my single hard drive into a 10gb just for the windows OS and program files then i used the rest for data like music and documents, in the long run it saves me the time of having to back up my data each time

  • #4
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    I think it's better to have more than one. For instance, if one hard disk fails...not all your data is gone and the system doesn't have to be down waiting for you to bring the replacement HDD. You could configure them as a RAID 5 to allow for fault tolerance.
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  • #5
    Senior Coder JamieR's Avatar
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    I have a 60GB HDD in my laptop, and a 120GB in my desktop (which is faulty so needs replacing) - The 120GB one had a two partitions - one 20GB one and then the other main partition of the disk which was 91GB (as formatted the disk has 111GB available).

    As said above, it depends on what you are going to be using it for. I had mainly work and stuff I had downloaded of the 'net on my 120gb seagate - but that is all gone now, as it faulty. I would have several 300GB SATA hard disks raided together to make a 1TB disk. That would be a waste of money if you only have something like 80GB off stuff to store, but if you are doing size-intensive video editing, then a raid setup of several disks would be a good idea.

  • #6
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    Multiple Harddrives

    I think everyone should have at least 1 additional Harddrive. My reasoning is two harddrives have a very small chance of failing at the same exact time. Also, it makes it very easy to keep things separated. I never was extremely crazy about partitioning harddrives because every now and then the partitions get crossed up or simply vanish.

    Like everyone else has said, it depends on what you need to save or work on.

  • #7
    Senior Coder JamieR's Avatar
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    RAID is ok, but with some raid configurations (RAID 0 I think), if one disk goes down, then you loose all data in that array - not pratical if you have a lot of data which you need to preserve.

    I would recommend having 1 or 2 SATA hard disks (300GB say) and connect them without RAID - seperate drives and then have a RAID config - but this depends on what your motherboard supports, the amount fo cash you have to spend on the hard disks and what you are going to use it for.

    ~Jamie.

  • #8
    Senior Coder gsnedders's Avatar
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    Personally, I've got 2 250GB SATA drives not in RAID, so if one disk goes down, I only lose what's on that hard drive, although, I do, of course, have back up. Basically, if you don't need files larger than one hard drive, keep them seperate.

  • #9
    Senior Coder JamieR's Avatar
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    make sense to have seperate drives if you have the cash to do so. I don't exactly like partitions, but made one on my 120GB disk, which has now packed up - so I've lost most of the stuff I've downloaded in the last 6 months - over 40GB - dang that isn't a lot

  • #10
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    Thanks for your replies, I guess it makes sense to have several HDs

    I currently have a 15GB + 95GB (I have Globally about 10GB free), so I probably get a new HD.

    One more question: Is it possible to replace the current HDs with bigger ones (plus an extra one), and move all of the data of the previous HDs exactly as it was into the new ones, without loosing installed programs and all of the Windows Xp stuff?


    BTW: 3 people use the PC, mostly for songs, videos, movies, games, and ovbliously tons of documents and pics. So it's used for vital bussiness info (my mom) and for school and media storage (my Brother and me).

  • #11
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    Yes!

    Maxtor harddrives give you an option to copy what is on existing harddrives to the new harddrive during initial installation. Most of the programs copied from an existing harddrive should behave also. Be prepared to reload any software that gets screwed up. All of your data will be fine.

  • #12
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    There are different RAID configurations that offer different things. Yes, with RAID 0 you'd lose the data if one drive fails because it is splitting all your data between the two drives. However if you were to use RAID 1, that isn't the case since that is mirroring and it does exactly what you'd think, whatever is on the first drive is always on the second. It protects against physical failure of one of the disks. The RAID level numbers don't mean anything in relation to one another, 1 isn't "better" than 0 and so forth, it is just different types. Here is an interesting article on using RAID 0 on a desktop machine: http://www.anandtech.com/storage/showdoc.aspx?i=2101
    OracleGuy


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