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  1. #1
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    Running multiple Linux distributions

    Does anyone here run more than one distro of Linux? If so, why? Are there any benefits to doing so...perhaps they are slightly different, and you can expand your knowledge/experience some more?

    I'm wondering about doing that, and wonder whether it is worth the trouble or not. I don't know much about Linux, but I very much want to learn.

  • #2
    Senior Coder JamieR's Avatar
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    mmhm I have never really played with linux, but it is worthwhile I think to run different distros of Linux if you want to learn more about linux and familirise yourself what that type of Operating System.

    I wonder if anyone could tell me the best linux distro(s). I know they are all relativily the same, but I would have thought versions (like redhat, SuSe, mandrake etc) are different interms of handling, UI and ease of use.

  • #3
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    That's what I was wondering: if they're more or less the same, then what's the point? It would mean installing and configuring that many similar OSes. Plus, you would have to install the programs for each, and keep the programs and kernels up to date, etc. Don't know if you would be able to share your files between distros...if so, then that's a plus!

    As for specific distros, I've only used Mandrake 10, and have found it to be fairly easy to set up and use. It uses a desktop and windowing system (Gnome or KDE - I just chose KDE, makes no difference to me), but you can also open and work through command-line windows, much like in Windows.

    If you want to try one without installing, download the SuSe live cd and burn it to a cd. Then restart the computer with the cd int he drive, and trhe computer will run a cd-based version of SuSe. That's waht I did when I was first getting into Linux, and it helped me realize what opportunities there were.

  • #4
    Senior Coder JamieR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grant Palin
    If you want to try one without installing, download the SuSe live cd and burn it to a cd. Then restart the computer with the cd int he drive, and trhe computer will run a cd-based version of SuSe. That's waht I did when I was first getting into Linux, and it helped me realize what opportunities there were.
    I've got a copy of Knoppix Linux which I can run from cd..but have never got round to trying it out. is that any good?

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    Quote Originally Posted by weazel
    I've got a copy of Knoppix Linux which I can run from cd..but have never got round to trying it out. is that any good?
    Can't say...again, Mandrake is the only one I've really used.

  • #6
    Senior Coder JamieR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grant Palin
    Can't say...again, Mandrake is the only one I've really used.
    O right, I might try it then - I believe there is a use for running different distros of linux, I suppose it is the same context as running windows 98, 2k, xp and server2k3 on different machines or 2 of them as a dual boot system.

  • #7
    Super Moderator sage45's Avatar
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    I've been using a Knoppix distro on my virtual pc... All in all I can't say that I have really had any problems with it...

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  • #8
    Supreme Overlord Spookster's Avatar
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    I've used Redhat Linux for years and now use their newest release of Redhat Fedora. I've also tried Mandrake and few others I can't recall. Out of all of them Redhat always comes out on top. They've spent the most time perfecting everything.

    The user interface UI as someone mentioned is not created by the organizations creating the distros of Linux. The GUIs are made by other organizations. The two most common GUIs are Gnome and KDE. The distros do customize the GUIs a bit for their distro but mostly the difference in the distros are going to be the kernels and the install wizards. Pretty much everything else that is packaged with the distro is third party software.
    Last edited by Spookster; 03-19-2005 at 01:18 PM.
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  • #9
    Senior Coder JamieR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sage45
    I've been using a Knoppix distro on my virtual pc... All in all I can't say that I have really had any problems with it...

    -sage-
    Ah neat - I'll have to try that then. I am correct in thinking that I can just boot from cd and run it ye?

    ~Jamie

  • #10
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    There's really no reason to run multiple distros. There is going to be a similar set up in all of them, and almost identical commands. You can install the same apps on all the distros so your not gaining anything by running say Debian and Mandrake at the same time. If anything your loosing space.

  • #11
    Super Moderator sage45's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by weazel
    Ah neat - I'll have to try that then. I am correct in thinking that I can just boot from cd and run it ye?

    ~Jamie

    Yeah you can do that... I preferred to install it to my virtual hard drive so that I could save settings...

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  • #12
    Senior Coder JamieR's Avatar
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    cool - as I said before, I've never really had much experience with Linux (windoze/mac boy me) but I'm willing to have a crack at linux.

    Jamie.

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    I have been looking to install Linux on the computer i am building, and am thinking about Ubuntu, but i was also thinking about Arch. i have heard god things about both of them and i am wondering if it would be worth it to install both on my computer. Is it?

    Tom


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