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  1. #1
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    Thumbs up how can solve hard disk bad sector

    how can solve hard disk bad sector?please

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    Supreme Overlord Spookster's Avatar
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    What OS and version are you using?
    Spookster
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    All Hail Spookster

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    Master Coder felgall's Avatar
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    Modern hard drives handle bad sectors automatically. They reserve a certain amount of space to allow ffor bad sectors and when sectors go bad they redirect those sectors into the reserved space so that the bad sector never shows beyond the drive itself. It is only once all the reserved space has been used to redirect bad sectors that they will start to show as bad beyond the drive internal systems. At that point the drive is very close to failure and if you are lucky you will have just enough time to clone the data across to a new drive using disk cloning software before the drive completely fails.
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    Regular Coder primefalcon's Avatar
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    Felgall speaks truth but I want to add that if the drive becomes unusable you have a couple of choices:

    1. Pay a few thousound to have the drive analyzed in a clean room!
    2. Purchase Spinrite ($89) and hope it can get the data off the drive
    3. Use ddrescue (free and open source) and as above... hope for the best

    windows also has a build in utility called chkdsk, which you can choose to do a full scan, and it may be able to fix... some more minor issues.... Linux/Unix has a similiar utility called fsck, which can scan and fix issues... mac I am not sure about, but being a Unix based system I'd imagine it probally has fsck as well

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    Master Coder felgall's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by primefalcon View Post
    Felgall speaks truth but I want to add that if the drive becomes unusable you have a couple of choices:

    1. Pay a few thousound to have the drive analyzed in a clean room!
    2. Purchase Spinrite ($89) and hope it can get the data off the drive
    3. Use ddrescue (free and open source) and as above... hope for the best
    A fourth alternative is to accept that the drive will eventually fail and keep backups of everything on it. When the drive eventually does fail and if you didn't get enough warning before it did to clone the drive beforehand you can simply insert a new drive in its place and restore everything from the latest backup.
    Stephen
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    Regular Coder primefalcon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by felgall View Post
    A fourth alternative is to accept that the drive will eventually fail and keep backups of everything on it. When the drive eventually does fail and if you didn't get enough warning before it did to clone the drive beforehand you can simply insert a new drive in its place and restore everything from the latest backup.
    Sometimes however drives can fail rather suddenly and knowing of ways to get data off can be a lifesaver.... and lets face it... how many people keep 1 backup of everything they do let alone following the 3,2,1 backup

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    Master Coder felgall's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by primefalcon View Post
    Sometimes however drives can fail rather suddenly and knowing of ways to get data off can be a lifesaver.... and lets face it... how many people keep 1 backup of everything they do let alone following the 3,2,1 backup

    Well people should keep a backup of everything after all it isn't that hard.

    1. You usually receive a disk with your operating system and application software. That is all the backup you need to be able to reinstall.
    2. Most updates can be downloaded again from the internet so you don't need your own backup copy.
    3. So the only files you really need to back up are your own files. On a Windows operating system there are really only two folders you need to back up "My Documents" and whichever folder your email program uses to store your emails.

    Just about any backup software can handle making the appropriate number of copies of the content of those folders and the software is usually supplied free when you buy an external drive intended for the purpose of making backups.

    Most people will implement such a backup system immediately after their first hard drive failure has lost them several years worth of files or their system gets a virus and all their files have to be deleted because that's the only way to clear the virus (there are hundreds of reasons for needing a backup that don't involve a hardware failure). In my computer security class a few years ago one of my students was responsible for running all the backups at his work but had never considered the need to backup his own data until attending my class and finding out how many thousands of different ways there are to lose your data (of which hard drive failure is one). So you are definitely correct that most people don't back up their data - however the other possible fixes for a hard drive failure only recover your data if that is the cause of the lose and don't help if the data is lost via any of the far more likely ways (one of the most likely being that you accidentally saved another file over the top of it).
    Stephen
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  • #8
    Regular Coder primefalcon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by felgall View Post
    Well people should keep a backup of everything after all it isn't that hard.

    1. You usually receive a disk with your operating system and application software. That is all the backup you need to be able to reinstall.
    2. Most updates can be downloaded again from the internet so you don't need your own backup copy.
    3. So the only files you really need to back up are your own files. On a Windows operating system there are really only two folders you need to back up "My Documents" and whichever folder your email program uses to store your emails.

    Just about any backup software can handle making the appropriate number of copies of the content of those folders and the software is usually supplied free when you buy an external drive intended for the purpose of making backups.

    Most people will implement such a backup system immediately after their first hard drive failure has lost them several years worth of files or their system gets a virus and all their files have to be deleted because that's the only way to clear the virus (there are hundreds of reasons for needing a backup that don't involve a hardware failure). In my computer security class a few years ago one of my students was responsible for running all the backups at his work but had never considered the need to backup his own data until attending my class and finding out how many thousands of different ways there are to lose your data (of which hard drive failure is one). So you are definitely correct that most people don't back up their data - however the other possible fixes for a hard drive failure only recover your data if that is the cause of the lose and don't help if the data is lost via any of the far more likely ways (one of the most likely being that you accidentally saved another file over the top of it).
    True there are a lot of ways to lose data, and I 100% agree that people should backup. I am just saying most people don't.... Also a lot of the other ways can be mitigated, for example say there's a filesystem/file corruption or can usualy recover data using a program like testdisk to recover data (as long as yo dont overwrite the data).

    Viruses especially on windows can be another matter entirely, there have been an icnreasing number of viruses that either write outside of the partition or even onto the firmware of graphics cards. and reinstall themselves even after a reinstall... as such an infected system can never be 100% trusted again.

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    I think some of you have got a bit carried away here. The op wasn't asking what to do when bad sectors appear but was asking how they go bad and what are they.

    @Op: Bad sectors (as I understand it) are sections of the disk that no longer hold data properly. Basically if you write a bit to the sector it won't be remembered and therefore can't be read from it.

    Most hard disks use spinning disks that hold billions of tiny magnetic particles. Just like real magnets, some may wear out and no longer hold any form of magnetic charge so they become useless. Just like the old cassette tapes. If your cassette recorder chewed it up the tape became useless for recording onto - you could try but playback would be abysmal because the head couldn't read the sound from the damaged tape.
    See my new CodingForums Blog: http://www.codingforums.com/blogs/tangoforce/

    Many useful explanations and tips including: Cannot modify headers - already sent, The IE if (isset($_POST['submit'])) bug explained, unexpected T_CONSTANT_ENCAPSED_STRING, debugging tips and much more!


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